PubMed Studies

Title URL
Conducted electrical weapon incapacitation during a goal-directed task as a function of probe spread. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22610783
The neuroendocrine effects of the TASER X26: a brief report. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19019594
A very interesting case study involving a TASER Conducted Electrical Weapon (CEW) used on a patient with a pacemaker. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18021368
Acute effects of an alternative electronic-control-device waveform in swine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19330471
Civilian use of a conducted electrical weapon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25453477
Cardiac fibrillation risks with TASER conducted electrical weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26736265
Emergency department evaluation after conducted energy weapon use: review of the literature for the clinician. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21220194
Additional information on taser safety. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19853787
Taser power. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3662175
Biases in TASER research. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22424028
Cardiac fibrillation risk of Taser weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24776896
Response to letter regarding article, “TASER electronic control devices can cause cardiac arrest in humans”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366841
Cardiac effects of electrical stun guns: does position of barbs contact make a difference? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18373757
Police use of TASER devices in mental health emergencies: a review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24656744
Taser blunt probe dart-to-heart distance causing ventricular fibrillation in pigs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19126456
40-Hz square-wave stimulation requires less energy to produce muscle contraction: compared with the TASERå¨ X26 conducted energy weapon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23682682
Comparison of predicted susceptibility between genotype and virtual phenotype HIV drug resistance interpretation systems among treatment-naive HIV-infected patients in Asia: TASER-M cohort analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23095645
Cardiac electrophysiological consequences of neuromuscular incapacitating device discharges. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16904552
Safety of pulsed electric devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19104137
Medical implications of the Taser. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20176700
Diffuse retinal injury from a non-penetrating TASER dart. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21909993
Serum troponin I measurement of subjects exposed to the Taser X-26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296010
Estimating neuromuscular stimulation within the human torso with Taser stimulus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17951851
Cardiovascular evaluation of electronic control device exposure in law enforcement trainees: a multisite study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20134349
[Alopecia reconstruction by expansion after a scalp burn injury caused by Taser(å¨): a case report]. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25433929
Pharyngeal perforation secondary to electrical shock from a Taser gun. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18499831
Discussion of “Effects of the taser in fatalities involving police confrontation”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1506837
Cutaneous current marks due to a stun gun injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12762539
Funding source and author affiliation in TASER research are strongly associated with a conclusion of device safety. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21884872
Conducted-Energy Device (Taser) Usage in Subjects With Mental Illness. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27236177
Myocardial infarction after taser exposure. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21141261
[Evidence for use of electroshock devices]. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11824095
Pulse variations of a conducted energy weapon (similar to the TASER X26 device): effects on muscle contraction and threshold for ventricular fibrillation*. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19737245
Conducted electrical weapons or stun guns: a review of 46 cases examined in casualty. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23574872
Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in association with a Taser-induced electrical injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24287515
Use of stun guns for venomous bites and stings: a review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11434486
Introduction of the Taser into British policing. Implications for UK emergency departments: an overview of electronic weaponry. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14988334
Generalized tonic-clonic seizure after a taser shot to the head. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19289806
Stun gun injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9440926
Taser-induced rapid ventricular myocardial capture demonstrated by pacemaker intracardiac electrograms. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17573837
Acute stress cardiomyopathy and deaths associated with electronic weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19144419
Are TASER guns really safe? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19516205
TASER(å¨) injury to the forehead. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21945507
Perforating ocular injury by Taser. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16764662
The ignitability of petrol vapours and potential for vapour phase explosion by use of TASERå¨ law enforcement electronic control device. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25498927
Muscle contraction during electro-muscular incapacitation: A comparison between square-wave pulses and the TASER(å¨) X26 Electronic control device. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20950313
Smoking” guns: Questions. ‰ÛÏSmoking‰Û guns: Answers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25330878
Incapacitation recovery times from a conductive electrical weapon exposure. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24668279
New TASER injuries: lacrimal canaliculus laceration and ethmoid bone fracture. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24491847
Foreign body lodged in distal phalanx of left index finger-taser dart. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16155754
In-vivo measurement of relationship between applied current amplitude and current density magnitude from 10 mA to 110 mA. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964796
Acute effects of TASER X26 discharges in a swine model. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18073604
The TASERed finger: A new entity. Case report and review of literature. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25958324
Police use of TASERs in the restraint and transport of persons with a mental illness. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21528742
The physiologic effects of a conducted electrical weapon in swine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17719136
Acute agitated delirious state associated with Taser exposure. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21287909
[Fatal stun gun injury using a modified animal sedation gun]. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12365333
Stun gun injury: a new presentation of the battered child syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1579401
Conducted electrical weapon (TASER) use against minors: a shocking analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929134
Sensitivity of TATP to a TASER electrical output. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25066579
Stun gun induced myotendinous injury of the iliopsoas and gluteus minimus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21298429
TASER(å¨) Electronic Control Device-Induced Rhabdomyolysis and Renal Failure: A Case Report. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26557540
In silico estimates of cell electroporation by electrical incapacitation waveforms. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964168
Rhabdomyolysis and oliguric renal failure after use of TASERå¨: is it really safe? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24351337
Effect of a Taser shot to the chest of a patient with an implantable defibrillator. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16500308
Non-fatal conductive energy device-related injuries treated in US emergency departments,  2005-2008. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21257680
Restraint in police use of force events: examining sudden in custody death for prone and not-prone positions. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25735781
Cohort profile: The PharmAccess African (PASER-M) and the TREAT Asia (TASER-M) monitoring studies to evaluate resistance–HIV drug resistance in sub-Saharan Africa and the Asia-Pacific. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21071386
Ophthalmic injuries from a TASER. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19166645
Electromuscular incapacitating devices discharge and risk of severe bradycardia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25710795
Letter by Heegaard et al regarding article,  “sudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23283865
Pneumothorax as a complication after TASER activation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19731168
Electromagnetic modelling of current flow in the heart from TASER devices and the risk of cardiac dysrhythmias. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18065834
Can the direct cardiac effects of the electric pulses generated by the TASER X26 cause immediate or delayed sudden cardiac arrest in normal adults? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17721165
The effects of continuous application of the TASER X26 waveform on Sus scrofa. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23489132
The relative risk of police use-of-force options: evaluating the potential for deployment of electronic weaponry. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16442332
Emergent diagnosis and management of TASER penetrating ocular injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26860451
Simulation studies of ultrashort,  high-intensity electric pulse induced action potential block in whole-animal nerves. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18390330
Intracranial taser dart penetration: Literature review and surgical management. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24960679
Cardiac safety of conducted electrical devices in pigs and their effect on pacemaker function. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20934296
Ventricular fibrillation after stun-gun discharge. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16135849
Cardiac stimulation with electronic control device application. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25154556
Effects of the Taser in fatalities involving police confrontation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1843180
A brain penetration after Taser injury: controversies regarding Taser gun safety. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22521367
Taser and Conducted Energy Weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26630100
Relation of Taser (electrical stun gun) deployment to increase in in-custody sudden deaths. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19268749
Cardiac monitoring of human subjects exposed to the taser. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17692758
Frontal Sinus TASER Dart Injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26603364
Catastrophic globe disruption as a result of a TASER injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21570244
TASER usage and neurological sequelae. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18554845
Assessment of the TASER XREP blunt impact and penetration injury potential using cadaveric testing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23067043
Pneumomediastinum and pulmonary interstitial emphysema after tracheal taser injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24057765
Taser and Taser associated injuries: a case series. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18807679
Cells to society: lactate and neuromuscular incapacitation devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964199
Cardiac safety of neuromuscular incapacitating defensive devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15683517
Electrical injury from Tasering and miscarriage. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1316038
Echocardiographic evaluation of TASER X26 in healthy volunteers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20466240
Acidosis, lactate, electrolytes, muscle enzymes, and other factors in the blood of Sus scrofa following repeated TASER exposures. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17239551
Physiologic effects of prolonged conducted electrical weapon discharge in ethanol-intoxicated adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20579553
Atrial fibrillation after taser exposure in a previously healthy adolescent. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20016356
Police use of the taser with people with mental illness in crisis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16754770
Ventricular fibrillation in a man shot with a Taser. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20515900
Title and Abstract Screening and Evaluation in Systematic Reviews (TASER): a pilot randomised controlled trial of title and abstract screening by medical students. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25335439
Taser penetrating ocular injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15808172
Use and safety of conducted electronic devices: what is known? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24975188
Electronic gun (Taser) injuries. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3800082
Risk group characteristics and viral transmission clusters in South-East Asian patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) circulating recombinant form (CRF) 01_AE and subtype B. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26362956
ICD oversensing caused by TASER. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23227948
Repetitive TASER X26 discharge resulted in adverse physiologic events with a dose-response relationship related to the duration of discharge in anesthetized swine model. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23066880
Electronic control device exposure: a review of morbidity and mortality. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21546120
Uncommon cause of death: the use of taser guns in South Florida. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18640409
Taser research in pigs not helpful. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17291944
Impaled Orbital TASER Probe Injury Requiring Primary Enucleation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25906335
Best evidence topic reports. Bet 2: Cardiac monitoring in adults after taser discharge. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19700587
Intracranial penetration of a TASER dart. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17606107
Health needs of detainees in police custody in England and Wales. Literature review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25287804
Fortuitous therapeutic effect of Taser shock for a patient in atrial fibrillation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18514367
[Analysis of death cases involved in TASER in the State of Maryland]. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22259863
Review article: Emergency Department implications of the TASER. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19682009
Tests on a shocking device–the stun gun. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2601476
Two patients subdued with a TASERå¨ device: cases and review of complications. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18439781
Cardiovascular effects of SPARK conducted electrical weapon in healthy subjects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27718445
Specific traces in stun gun deployment. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15909173
Successful resuscitation of a patient in asystole after a TASER injury using a hypothermia protocol. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19555635
Cataract secondary to electrical shock from a Taser gun. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17720092
Tasers–less than lethal! https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19416583
Letter by Sheridan regarding articles, “TASER electronic control devices can cause cardiac arrest in humans” and “TASER electronic control devices and cardiac arrests: coincidental or causal?”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366839
The TASER safety controversy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22029461
A TASER conducted electrical weapon with cardiac biomonitoring capability: Proof of concept and initial human trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27448029
Cardiac current density distribution by electrical pulses from TASER devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17946756
Theoretical comparisons of nerve and muscle activation by neuromuscular incapacitation devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964799
Presenting rhythm in sudden deaths temporally proximate to discharge of TASER conducted electrical weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19473120
Perforating globe injury from Taser trauma. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20551855
Taser-Related Testicular Trauma. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26592466
Forensic reporting of TASER exposure: An examination of situational and exposure characteristics. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26344450
Stun gun injuries in the abuse and death of a seven-month-old infant. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12570224
Taser X26 discharges in swine: ventricular rhythm capture is dependent on discharge vector. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19077646
TASER conducted electrical weapons and implanted pacemakers and defibrillators. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964055
Ventricular fibrillation threshold of rapid short pulses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22254298
TASER X26 discharges in swine produce potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmias. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18211316
A rational response to Taser strikes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15902081
Thoracic compression fractures as a result of shock from a conducted energy weapon: a case report. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17826867
Immediate cardiovascular effects of the Taser X26 conducted electrical weapon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19625551
Safety and injury profile of conducted electrical weapons used by law enforcement officers against criminal suspects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19157651
Transcardiac conducted electrical weapon (TASER) probe deployments: incidence and outcomes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22674039
Withdrawal of taser electroshock devices: too much, too soon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16126148
Validity of the small swine model for human electrical safety risks. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28268796
15-Second conducted electrical weapon exposure does not cause core temperature elevation in non-environmentally stressed resting adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17983716
An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons and two probe designs using a swine comparative cardiac safety model. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23543462
An evaluation of two conducted electrical weapons using a swine comparative cardiac safety model. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24895072
Echocardiographic evaluation of TASER X26 probe deployment into the chests of human volunteers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20006201
Effect of an electronic control device exposure on a methamphetamine-intoxicated animal model. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20370784
Electrical characteristics of an electronic control device under a physiologic load: a brief report. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20015134
Fortuitous effect of TASER shock misleading. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19167625
Response to “Acute agitated delirious state associated with TASER exposure”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22364071
The cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic effects of a long duration electronic control device exposure in human volunteers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20502988
The effect of an electronic control device on muscle injury as determined by creatine kinase enzyme. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20683680
The neurocognitive effects of simulated use-of-force scenarios. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24213973
The physiologic effects of multiple simultaneous electronic control device discharges. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20411076
The respiratory, metabolic, and neuroendocrine effects of a new generation electronic control device. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20884143
Confirmation of respiration during trapezial conducted electrical weapon application. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18371000
Effect of simulated resistance, fleeing, and use of force on standardized field sobriety testing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24934160
Absence of electrocardiographic change after prolonged application of a conducted electrical weapon in physically exhausted adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19443165
Acidosis and catecholamine evaluation following simulated law enforcement “use of force” encounters. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20653572
Cardiovascular and physiologic effects of conducted electrical weapon discharge in resting adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16551780
Echocardiographic evaluation of a TASER-X26 application in the ideal human cardiac axis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19244634
Human cardiovascular effects of a new generation conducted electrical weapon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20537475
Human research review of the TASER electronic control device. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964797
Introduction of the conducted electrical weapon into a hospital setting. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20117901
Lactate and pH evaluation in exhausted humans with prolonged TASER X26 exposure or continued exertion. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539437
Letter by Ho and Dawes regarding article, “sudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23283864
Markers of acidosis and stress in a sprint versus a conducted electrical weapon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24314505
Physiologic effects of a new-generation conducted electrical weapon on human volunteers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24238599
Prolonged TASER use on exhausted humans does not worsen markers of acidosis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19555610
Reply to Strote, Lay person use of conducted electrical weapon research. Forensic Sci. Int. volume (2014) page XX-XX. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24646658
TASER device-induced rhabdomyolysis is unlikely. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20138460
Unexpected arrest-related deaths in america: 12 months of open source surveillance. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19561821
Acidosis, lactate, electrolytes, muscle enzymes, and other factors in the blood of Sus scrofa following repeated TASER exposures. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16289999
An animal model to investigate effectiveness and safety of conducted energy weapons (including TASER devices). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20141556
Blood factors of Sus scrofa following a series of three TASER electronic control device exposures. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17630236
Blood lactate concentration after exposure to conducted energy weapons (including TASERå¨ devices): is it clinically relevant? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23605975
Deaths in custody: are some due to electronic control devices (including TASER devices) or excited delirium? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20083043
Effects of a TASERå¨ conducted energy weapon on the circulating red-blood-cell population and other factors in Sus scrofa. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23543463
Exposures of Sus scrofa to a TASER(å¨) conducted electrical weapon: no effects on 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns of plasma proteins. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25319243
Exposures to conducted electrical weapons (including TASERå¨ devices): how many and for how long are acceptable? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25443856
Increased hematocrit after applications of conducted energy weapons (including TASER(å¨) devices) to Sus scrofa. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21198623
Pathophysiologic changes due to TASERå¨ devices versus excited delirium: potential relevance to deaths-in-custody? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21550562
Physiological effects of the TASER C2 conducted energy weapon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19598011
Repeated or long-duration TASER electronic control device exposures: acidemia and lack of respiration. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19936976
Survival of anesthetized Sus scrofa after cycling (7-second on/3-second off) exposures to an electronic control device for 3 minutes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21464698
TASERå¨ conducted electrical weapons: misconceptions in the scientific/medical and other literature. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25549958
Transmitted drug resistance in recently infected HIV-positive Individuals from four urban locations across Asia (2007-2010) – TASER-S. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25685169
The Taser: research, patients, and language (Tom Swift found) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3225441
Physiological effects of the taser. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18565386
Taser dart ingestion. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3323301
The Taser weapon: a new emergency medicine problem. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4061994
Realities of biomedical product liability suits and the role of junk science: from breast implants to TASER weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23014704
A novel mechanism for electrical currents inducing ventricular fibrillation: The three-fold way to fibrillation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21096790
Cardiac effects of varying pulse charge and polarity of TASER conducted electrical weapons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964054
Defibrillation success rates for electrically-induced fibrillation: hair of the dog. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23365986
Do TASER Electrical Weapons Actually Electrocute? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26968394
Fatal traumatic brain injury with electrical weapon falls. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27423132
Infection Risk From Conducted Electrical Weapon Probes: What Do We Know? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27429421
Physiology and pathology of TASER electronic control devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19329071
Response to letter regarding article,  “TASER electronic control devices and cardiac arrests: coincidental or causal?”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25366840
Sensitive swine and TASER electronic control devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19086217
TASER electronic control devices and cardiac arrests: coincidental or causal? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24396012
TASER electronic control devices and eye injuries. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22246198
TASER safety. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18809900
The stability of electrically induced ventricular fibrillation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23367388
Ventricular fibrillation risk estimation for conducted electrical weapons: critical convolutions. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22254302
Cardiac changes due to electronic control devices? A computer-based analysis of electrical effects at the human heart caused by an ECD pulse applied to the body’s exterior. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24712742
Functioning and effectiveness of electronic control devices such as the TASERå¨ M- and X-series: a review of the current literature. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515413
Wound ballistic evaluation of the Taserå¨ XREP ammunition. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21984167
Do electrical stun guns (TASER-X26) affect the functional integrity of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17491105
Effects of cocaine intoxication on the threshold for stun gun induction of ventricular fibrillation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16904553
Cardiac fibrillation risk of TASER X-26 dart mode application. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22037697
Interference of implanted cardiac pacemakers with TASER X26 dart mode application. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22691428
Numerically simulated cardiac exposure to electric current densities induced by TASER X-26 pulses in adult men. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20876969
Letter by Nanthakumar and Waxman regarding article, “sudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23283862
TaserX26 current increases with dart depth. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20811087
Use of Tasers on people with mental illness A New Zealand database study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21126765
Electronic weaponry–a question of safety. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2024801
Current distribution in tissues with conducted electrical weapons operated in drive-stun mode. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28269446
Design and medical safety of neuromuscular incapacitation devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17941324
Electrical safety of conducted electrical weapons relative to requirements of relevant electrical standards. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24110943
Finite element modeling of electric field effects of TASER devices on nerve and muscle. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17946454
Medical safety of TASER conducted energy weapon in a hybrid 3-point deployment mode. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19964800
The sternum as an electrical shield. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25570983
Theoretical possibility of ventricular fibrillation during use of TASER neuromuscular incapacitation devices. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19164004
Trends in less-lethal use of force techniques by police services within England and Wales: 2007-2011. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24174272
Response to TASER electronic control devices and eye injuries. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22262232
Thoracic spine compression fracture after TASER activation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18191526
Commentary on: Kunz SN, Zinka B, Fieseler S, Graw M,Peschel O. Functioning and effectiveness of electronic control devices such as the TASERå¨ M- and X-Series: a review of the current literature. J Forensic Sci 2012; doi: 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2012.02167.x [Epub ahead of print]. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22950696
Conducted electrical weapon injuries must be more broadly considered. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19616732
Conducted electrical weapon use by law enforcement: an evaluation of safety and injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20032795
Emergency department evaluation of conducted energy weapon (CEW)-injured patients. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24440621
Lay person use of conducted electrical weapon research. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24637015
Safety of transcardiac conducted electrical weapon probe deployments remains unclear. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24433752
Taser safety remains unclear. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18565384
TASER study results do not reflect real-life restraint situations. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19751633
Taser use in restraint-related deaths. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16997772
Use of force by law enforcement: an evaluation of safetyand injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20130486
Estimating the probability that the Taser directly causes human ventricular fibrillation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20064078
Respiratory and Cardiovascular Response during Electronic Control Device Exposure in Law Enforcement Trainees. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23616772
Funding source and author affiliation in TASER research are strongly associated with a conclusion of device safety”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22424027
Letter by Vilke et al regarding article, “sudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device”. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23283863
Pathophysiologic changes due to TASER devices versus excited delirium: potential relevance to deaths-in-custody? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21771562
Physiologic effects of the TASER after exercise. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19594461
Physiological effects of a conducted electrical weapon on human subjects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17719689
Re: emergency department evaluation of conducted energy weapon (CEW)-injured patients. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24412057
Twelve-lead electrocardiogram monitoring of subjects before and after voluntary exposure to the Taser X26. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18082773
Taser dart-to-heart distance that causes ventricular fibrillation in pigs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17355063
Ventricular fibrillation time constant for swine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18812645
Response to letters regarding article, ‰ÛÏsudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23405418
Sudden cardiac arrest and death following application of shocks from a TASER electronic control device. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22547671
TASER electronic control devices can cause cardiac arrest in humans. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24396013